Summing up the Dutchies per MLB organization: Washington Nationals

Today in “Summing up the Dutchies ” the organization that used to be known as Montreal Expos. Since 2005 they are know as:

      Number of Dutchies:  3

Matt den Dekker:
Matt den Dekker was born in the USA, but there are close ties with Dutch ancestors. Matt was drafted by the New York Mets in the fifth round of the 2010 draft. In the summer of that year he made his first steps in pro ball with the GCL Mets. After only five games he was promoted to the Savannah SandGnats of the Full A. After spending the remainder of the season in Savannah, his .346 batting average earned him a promotion to A Advanced St. Lucie in 2011. After 67 games and a .296 batting average in St. Luicie, he was promoted to AA Binghamton. Apparently the difference between AAdvanced and and AA was a bit too much as his batting average didn’t get any higher than .235.
Matt started the 2012 season in Binghamton and he fared a lot better. A batting average of .340 after 58 games he was promoted to AAA Buffalo where he batted .220 for the season.
During the 2013 Spring Training Camp he broke his wrist. After his rehab, he started the season at St. Lucie but after fourteen games he was sent up to Las Vegas before he was called up to New York. But in the Bigs he struggled mightily as he only hit .207. Matt spent the biggest part of the 2014 season in AAA Las Vegas. In the Sin City he posted a .334 batting average that earned him another promotion to New York. This time he did a lot better that tne previous cup of tea: .250.
In the off season the Mets traded Matt to Washington in exchange for Jerry Blevins. Matt started the season in Washington but was sent down to Syracuse after just eight days. With the Chiefs he batted a modest .213 but was called up nevertheless. So far his batting average is in the low .211. His defense is quite okay with a career fielding percentage of .981.

It remains to be seen how Den Dekker will develop. He was a promising farmhand but in the Bigs, it didn’t pan out yet.

Randolph Oduber:
Randolph was drafted in 2009 by the San Francisco Giants, but he let his study prevail. One year later he was drafted again, this time by the Nationals. Later that year he debuted with the GCL Nationals. The (now) 26-year old Aruban hit a promising .366 in the Gulf Coast League so he was sent up to A Full Season Hagerstown. But in the eight games that he played with the Suns, he struggled mightily. After splitting the 2011 season between the Gulf Coast League and the South Atlantic League Randolph spent the entire 2012 season with the Potomac Nationals of the A Advanced Carolina League.
In 2013 Randolph joined team Netherlands for the World Baseball Classic and started the season with Potomac, where he would finish the season after a short stint with AA Harrisburg.
After spending the biggest part with Potomac in 2014, Randolph joined team Netherlands for the 2014 European Cup. He batted .448 for the tournament with an .862 slugging percentage.
In 2015 he played only seven games before he broke his ankle. In those seven games, Randolph batted just .188.

In six seasons Randolph’s career batting average is .268

Spencer Kieboom:
Spencer was drafted as 174th player in the 2012 draft by the Nationals. He was appointed to the roster of the A Short Season Auburn DoubleDays. In 41 games he batted .258. In 2013 he received an invitation to join team Netherlands for the World Baseball Classic but do to an injury to his elbow he had to skip the tournament and the biggest part of the season. Eventually he played 4 games with the GCL Nationals in whihc he batted .333.
In 2014, the 24-year old catcher spent the season in Hagerstown where he batted a very decent .309. After the regular season he was appointed the the roster of the Mesa Solar Sox of the Arizona Fall League. After the AFL, Spencer got an invitation to attend the Nationals Spring Training as non roster invitee. .
Spencer was projected to start the season at AA, but eventually he was sent to Potomac where he played until he got injured. On July 24 he played his last game before ending up on the disabled list. He batted .248, sported a fielding percentage of .991 and threw out 40% of the potential base stealers in the games that he played this season.

At the start of the season, Spencer entered the top 20 of the Nationals prospects at the seventeenth spot.

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